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Three reasons that jobs keep disappearing

Job cuts continue to occur, despite improved corporate income and earnings reports. That confuses workers who think payroll cuts should be winding down and hiring should be picking up.


Unfortunately, those thinkers need to keep three points in mind:

Payroll is the biggest expense in most organizations. As such, it provides the most places to cut. And make no mistake, cost cutting is not over.

Outsourcing -- the transfer of noncore operations to outside providers -- continues apace because of the perceived economies of scale. When the outsourced jobs stay within the United States, the net domestic job loss is minimized, but when the outsourced jobs go offshore, there's a net loss for workers who'd like to stay in the U.S.

The warmer economy is hatching more merger and acquisition deals. Such combinations produce job redundancies and, invariably, job eliminations.

About eight out of 10 employees say they would consider taking a job that paid less if it came with a generous benefits package.

That thought comes from a survey by TrueCareers, an online job board, in which seven out of 10 respondents said employee benefits are a "very important" consideration when job hunting.

What benefits are most desired? Health and dental insurance led the pack by far.

When asked what benefit they want that their employer doesn't offer, the most frequently mentioned benefit was tuition assistance, which two out of 10 respondents said would be nice. About the same percentage wanted flexible work schedules.

Here's an unusual career resource book: The Professional Sign Language Interpreter's Handbook.

Linda Humphreys, author and certified interpreter for the deaf, said it's written for people curious about the profession, as well as those already in it who are looking for additional job opportunities.

Her Web site is www.interpretinginfo.com .

Quote to consider: "Not to stick thumbs in the eyes of influential people is another good rule. They got to be influential for a reason." -- E.J. Heresniak, business consultant, writing in The Conference Board's Across the Board magazine.

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